Category Archives: Photo

Markit Behind The Scenes Photo Gallery

tyler-right-b4-roof-drop-e1406574093754-878x1300

Markit has a tight gallery up on their site from the lens of Dennis Enarson and within you will find photos like this one of Tyler Fernengel seconds before doing the unthinkable (which you can see in his most recent video). To enter the gallery click here.

“rad.” by Rob Perry

rob perry rad

“I’m Rob Perry, I ride BMX and I study photography at college. I had started to create a small collection of my favourite photos that I had been shooting and I thought that it would be cool if I could make a small book or layout design to show these photos and also show off our BMX scene in Milton Keynes, England to everyone. However, I didn’t know how to create this layout/book.

Then luckily in college a few weeks later, a project came up where we had to create a photo journalism piece and straight away I knew I could use BMX. I could work with these images while learning a way to create this small book. This decision meant that I could be out riding, shooting more and having a good time with the different people that ride from our crew in the Milton Keynes area. Throughout this project while shooting the photos, it helped me to think more about the photos I was taking and to look into them to see what is actually happening around the BMX rider to do with the background and the framing of everything. This helped my photos as it meant the viewer would feel more involved with the atmosphere of the whole photo and the people. I took all of these photos on a Canon 500d and an Olympus OM-10.”

Fisheye Photo Contest Winners

moliterno fisheye

The results are in! Greg Moliterno takes the cake with this high-intensity shot of Shane Cecil. Runners-up:

duffield fisheyeKyle Lee by Shawn Duffield

josh moore fisheyeMike Curley by Josh Moore

ewan fisheyeEwan Thacker

kevin fisheyeBenjamin Martinot by Kevin Proust

Pegs N’ Bacon Framed Prints Available

regis and rone

Framed 24×36″ prints from Scott Marceau‘s Pegs N’ Bacon show are available for purchase in the TCU webstore. This photo of Regis is also available on a limited edition t-shirt. You can view the entire gallery online here.

Fisheye Photo Contest

fisheye photo contest

Since the popularization of the fisheye lens in the 1960s, its use has varied from scientific applications to hip hop music videos to caricaturistic portraits of Golden Retrievers. Its value in the action sports realm burgeoned with help from the early pioneers of skateboard photography like C.R. Stecyk, Glen Friedman and Hugh Holland. The ultra-wide view and extreme distortion adds energy to the subject while keeping them in context with their environment. It also helps when there are obstructions in the scene which work against the use of a longer focal length.

Regardless of the reason, action sports photographers use the fisheye a lot (too much?) and it doesn’t take a professional to recognize when it’s being used incorrectly. While I like to believe that there are no “rules” in photography (therein lies the art), there are definite guidelines and any photo editor will tell you that the fisheye lens brings with it a certain expectation that the photographer will follow them- to a certain extent.

My go-to comment in the Push It A Stop Flickr pool is “get closer!” when I see a fisheye photo where the rider is a speck in the frame (and the rest is filled with useless information). I read/heard somewhere that “if the fisheye isn’t in danger of getting hit then you aren’t using it correctly.” This somewhat hyperbolic statement rings true in what my friends and I used to call “the DIG cover shot” (shouts to Ricky Adam) where a headless rider’s front wheel had to have been brushing the camera.

Mike Tag Stockwell print

On the other end of the spectrum, the fisheye can be used to fill the frame with an exaggerated environment while the rider- still the subject of the photo- becomes a drop in the ocean (the most prominent example in my mind being a photo of Mike Hoder riding the ramp in his Brooklyn backyard shot from the upper-level fire escape by Rob Dolecki).

This contest is about proper fisheye usage, not just seeing who can get their lens destroyed by a flying bike.

Upload your entries (limit 3) to the Flickr pool with the words “Fisheye Contest” somewhere in the title. Much like the guidelines for using the fisheye lens itself, the rules for the contest are vague and will probably not be adhered to. In any case, we will choose our favorite fisheye shot at the end of June.

Winning photographer and rider will receive Push It A Stop/The Come Up prize packages and be featured on the front page.

Good luck and be careful of front wheels!

scotty fufanu chenga 2002Scotty Wemmer, 2002